Sorry for the Hiatus

Due to some recent personal upheaval, I've not been able to contribute content on my blog. I've been taking some time to re-evaluate what is important to me and how I plan to start contributing to my site again.

Commenting

When I first started my blog I didn't give much consideration to my comment strategy. The quantity of comments didn't warrant over thinking the situation, however, with the recent influx of comments I've been receiving (especially due to one post in particular. What I soon had to deal with was a massive influx of comments - some of which added value to the conversation, but unfortunately, most of which added nothing but ignorance. I was forced to make a decision to either continue allowing comments or to shut them down on the site.

I've decided to keep comments alive on The Classic Yuppie. The volume of valuable, positive comments of people that I have helped, feedback that's made my content better and conversations that have started as a result of a post is such that more harm than good would come of restricting visitors' ability to comment, simply because a few bad apples have chosen to display their ignorance in a public forum. I will not punish those that want to contribute valuable insight via comments. I considered forcing commenters to log in to Disqus, however, I feel this is counter-productive to the open exchange of ideas. Moderation ultimately falls on me (the blog author). I have a comment policy and I should be enforcing it - and that's exactly what I plan to do going forward. Abusive, disrespectful or other comments posted will get the offending poster blacklisted in the Disqus system.

Content

I've given an equal amount of consideration with regard to content. I've recently received some feedback regarding the name of my site and the content - namely, that the title of the site wasn't representative of the content it dispenses. After much consideration, I have decided that I would like to keep doing what I do best and blog about technology. Names of several tech blogs exist which aren't remotely indicative of the content which can be found there: MG Siegler's parislemon.com, and John Gruber's Daring Fireball, just to name a few. In the end, I think it's more about establishing your personality and unique brand while writing about what you love more than using a immediately recognizable name for your blog. After all, if the content is good enough and it is valuable to the reader, your audience will keep coming back and you'll build that brand on your own. That's the true recognition of your hard work.

As always, feel free to post your thoughts about these ideas in the comments section. I'm always interested in hearing why you agree, disagree, or to listen to a radical new idea. That's what this blog is all about.